I tested my home for radon and the level came back high. What do I do?
The EPA standard of 4 picocuries per liter of air is an annual standard. If you aren’t in a hurry (for example, selling or buying the tested home), then re-test the home for 3 months to a year using a long term radon test kit, to get a better idea of what the average level is. If you don’t have the time, then re-test with another short term radon test kit. If the average of the two short term tests OR the result of the long term test is 4 pCi/l or higher, hire a radon mitigator to install a mitigation system.

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1. What if my home does not have a basement, do I still need to test for radon?
2. Where should the test kit be placed?
3. My home was built with radon resistant new construction (RRNC), what is that?
4. What are the costs associated with radon mitigation?
5. How do I know if my radon mitigation system was installed correctly?
6. I want to measure the radon levels in my home. How do I do this?
7. How does Tri-County Health Department test for radon and is there a fee?
8. Can I purchase a radon test kit and do the test myself?
9. I tested my home for radon and the level came back high. What do I do?